Pillow talk!

Following my post about the chevron pillow/cushion cover, I’ve received emails asking me how I made it. So I thought it would be a good excuse to make more covers and write a tutorial at the same time. My cover is quilted through three layers on the front and is fully lined. The closure is envelope style. I’m sure many of you already make covers in your own way but this is my way. I like it because it doesn’t require buttons or zippers, though you could add them if you wish. Also, there are no fabric scraps left.

Here is my chevron version again, in case you missed it.

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And the quilting.

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Materials

You will need: 19.5 inches (half a metre) off the roll for the outside of the cover and the same size for the lining, assuming that both fabrics are 42 inches wide. Also, a piece of wadding/batting which is about 21 x 21 inches.

Method

1. Cut the selvedge edges off both sides of both pieces of fabric. I chose bright orange with white spots for the outer fabric and white lining.

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2.Lay the lining fabric to one side. Cut a square which is 19.5 x 19.5 inches from the outer fabric. Cut the remainder in half to give two rectangles measuring 19.5 x 12 inches approx. If yours is slightly bigger than 12 inches, that’s fine. It will give a larger overlap on the envelope closure.

3. Repeat with the lining fabric to obtain exactly the same sized pieces as you did for the outer fabric.

4. Take one rectangle of each fabric and place them right sides together.

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5. Sew a one quarter inch seam along one 19.5 inch side. Repeat with the other two rectangles.

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6. Lay these pieces on the pressing board with the outer fabric uppermost and the new seam at the top. Lift the uppermost fabric and press away from you so the seam is pressed towards the outer fabric.

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7. Now put the rectangles with wrong sides together and press along the seam so that the outer fabric is just peeping around the edge. Trim the lining in line with the main fabric along the long edge. Repeat with the other rectangles. The back pieces are now finished.  

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8. Next, the quilted front of the cover. Lay the wadding/batting flat on the table. Place the wrong side of the lining square on top of the wadding. Make sure it is lying square and smooth it out.

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9. There should be a small amount of wadding all around the edge of the lining which you should trim away so they are both the same size.

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10. Carefully, turn the double layer square over and place the outer fabric on top. You should now have lining on the bottom, wadding in the middle and the outer fabric on top.

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11. Sew along one side through all three layers, close to the edge. This will anchor this side ready for quilting. Place pins at intervals through all layers.

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12. Quilt as desired. For this cover, I folded my square in half and sewed a line along the fold from the stitched edge to the opposite side. I then attached my little gadget to the machine so that I could sew lines parallel to the first one at intervals of 1.5 inches.

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13. I then folded my square in half diagonally, sewed a line along the fold and repeated the paralell lines process.

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14. Now, all we need to do is sew all of the pieces together to make the cover. Lay the quilted square on the table with the right side uppermost. Place one of the rectangles with the lining uppermost at the edge of the square. Pin in position.

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15. Now pin the other rectangle to the other side of the square. If you are using fabric that has a pattern with a right way up, now is the time to change positions if you need to. Don’t wait until after it has been sewn together.

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16. Sew all the way around the cover through all layers. Take care to stitch slowly over the thicker parts where the fabrics overlap. If you have a serger, this stage will be much faster as you will be able to sew a seam and overlock the edges at the same time.

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17. I don’t have a serger so I switched to zig-zag stitch and sewed around the outside edge of the seam. Trim the edge and snip across the corners.

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18. Turn the cover to the right way, press the edges and insert a pad. Stand back and admire Smile.

Here is my finished cushion. I hope you like it.

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I couldn’t stop!

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I quilted this one with another different pattern, keeping it simple.

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Here they are all together.

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Quilt as you go mug rug tutorial

This is my favourite way to make a mug rug as there is no need to quilt it at the end.

You will need:

Backing fabric 11 x 9 inches

Wadding 11 x 9 inches (you may wish to use heat resistant wadding but do not use polyester wadding as it will melt onto your iron)

Five strips 8 x 2.5 inches

Binding 48 x 2.25 inches, folded and pressed in half with wrong sides facing.

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Lay the wadding on top of the backing fabric.

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Position the first strip, right side up, about one quarter of an inch from the right

hand edge.

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Sew in place using a quarter inch seam through all three layers.

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Turn the work so that the strip is positioned to the left.

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Lay the next strip on top of the previous strip with right sides facing.

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Sew a quarter inch seam through all layers down the right hand side of

the strip.

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Lift the second strip and press towards the right.

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Like this.

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Place the third strip on top of the second strip with right sides facing.

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Sew a quarter inch seam through all layers down the right hand side of

the strip.

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Lift the new strip and press to the right.

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Continue until all five strips are attached. Then sew down the right hand

side of the final strip.

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Then sew along the top and bottom and trim all the way round to make a

rectangle.

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Line up the raw edges of the folded binding strip with the edge of the mug rug.

Leave about 3 inches before starting to sew a quarter inch seam down the side.

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Stop sewing one quarter of an inch before the first corner.

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Pull the work away from the needle area of the machine. There is no need to

cut the threads. Turn the work to this position.

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Lift the binding and finger press in this position. The fold should make a

45 degree angle and the raw edge should be in line with the right hand side

of the work.

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Keeping the fold in place, bring the binding down in line with the next raw

edge of the work.

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Continue to sew from the very edge of the work to the next corner and

repeat until all four corners are done. Stop sewing about three inches

before the finish.

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Overlap the ends of the binding strip and cut so there is a half inch overlap.

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This bit is quite tricky! Sew the ends of the binding, right sides together,

using a quarter inch seam.

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Finger press the seam open then continue to sew the rest of the binding

to the mug rug. Turn the binding towards the back of the work.

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Hand stitch the binding to the back, folding to make the mitred corners.

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Ta-da!

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Just testing Winking smile

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I’ve also made table runners, toppers, cushion fronts and place mats using

the ”Quilt as you go” method. It also works well for small jelly roll strip quilts.

If you want some extra challenge….use diagonal strips, maybe of different

widths.

Traditional Patchwork Quilt Pattern and Tutorial (Part 14)

Here are the instructions for the sashing. Enjoy!

You will need:

Twenty dark 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares.

Thirty one white 2 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ rectangles.

Lay out your blocks and sashing pieces in their final positions for the finished quilt.

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Sew white rectangles to the sides of the blocks to complete four rows like this. Press seams towards the sashing.

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Next, make the sashing rows with the dark squares. Sew dark squares to five white rectangles. I prefer to chain sew to save time and thread. Press seams towards the rectangles.

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You should now have five of these.

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Sew a dark square to each of the other ends of these five rectangles.

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Now sew alternately a white rectangle then a dark square until each piece has four dark squares and three white rectangles. Here are mine after three dark squares. Keep going to finish.

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Lay these strips in place.

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Now sew the rows together. I prefer to sew together the first and second rows and then sew together the third and fourth rows and so on until I have pairs of rows. Then I sew together the pairs of rows.That way, I am only working with a large quilt top in the machine for one seam.

Here is my finished quilt top.

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Traditional Patchwork Quilt Pattern and Tutorial (Part 13)

Here is the final block from a series of 12. The finished size when the block is sewn into the quilt top is 12 inches square. Enjoy!

block 12

You will need:

One medium 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square

Two light 4 7/8″ x 4 7/8″ squares

Two medium 4 7/8″ x 4 7/8″ squares

One light 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ square

One dark 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ square

Here are my patches.

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First, take two light and two medium 4 7/8″ squares. Lay the light squares on top of the medium ones.

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Draw the diagonals on the top squares.

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Sew one quarter of an inch along both sides of the lines.

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Cut along the drawn lines.

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Press open.

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Lay the on a table with the 4 1/2″ medium square in the centre.

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Now take the light and dark 5 1/4″ squares and lay the light one on top of the dark one.

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Draw both diagonals.

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Sew one quarter of an inch along both sides of one diagonal.

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Cut along both diagonals.

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Open and press towards the dark fabric. Each pair of squares will give two smaller blocks like this.

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Sew together taking care to butt the seams up against each other to give good points in the centre.

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Lay with the rest of the squares on the table.

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Sew three rows together taking care to alternate the way the seams are pressed on each row. I press seams away from the four-patch squares.

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Sew the three rows together and press.

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Traditional Patchwork Quilt Pattern and Tutorial (Part 12)

Here is the eleventh block from a series of 12. The finished size when the block is sewn into the quilt top is 12 inches square. Enjoy!

block 11

You will need:

Two white 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares

One white 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ square

Two light 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares

One light 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ square

Two dark 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares

One dark 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ square

Here are my patches.

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First, take two light 4 1/2″ squares with one white and one dark 4 1/2″ squares. Lay the white on top of a light square and another light on top of a dark square.

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Draw the diagonals on the top squares.

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Sew one quarter of an inch along both sides of the lines.

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Cut along the drawn lines. Press open.

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Now take the white and dark 4 1/2″ squares.

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Cut them both in half diagonally. Put these triangles to one side.

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Take the three 5 1/4″ squares.

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Cut each of them along both diagonals to get four small triangles of each colour.

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Lay them out in position with the larger triangles that were put to one side.

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Sew the small triangles together first. Then sew the double triangles to the large triangles. Lay them all out again with the corner squares in position.

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Sew three rows together taking care to alternate the way the seams are pressed on each row. Sew the three rows together and press.

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Traditional Patchwork Quilt Pattern and Tutorial (Part 11)

Here is the tenth block from a series of 12. The finished size when the block is sewn into the quilt top is 12 inches square. Enjoy!

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You will need:

Two white 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares

Two white 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ squares

Two medium 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ squares

Six white 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares

Six dark 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares

Here are my patches.

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First make the four-patch blocks. Start with pairs of white and dark 2 1/2″ squares.

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Chain sew them together.

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Press the seams towards the dark fabric.

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Arrange the pieces into the four-patch blocks. Chain sew all three of the four-patch blocks, taking care to butt the seams against each other to ensure a good match in the centre.

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You should now have three four-patch squares.

Next, take the white and medium 5 1/4″ squares and lay the white ones on top of the medium ones.

Draw the two diagonals on each pair.

Sew one quarter of an inch away from both sides of one diagonal.

Cut along both diagonals.

Press the pieces open. Arrange them in pairs like this.

Make sure the seams butt up against each other and chain sew together. Open and press the squares. Arrange all of the pieces like this.

Sew three rows together taking care to alternate the way the seams are pressed on each row. Sew the three rows together and press.

Traditional Patchwork Quilt Pattern and Tutorial (Part 10)

Here is the ninth block from a series of 12. The finished size when the block is sewn into the quilt top is 12 inches square. Enjoy!

You will need:

Four light 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares

One white 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″″ square

Two light 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ squares

Two medium 5 1/4″″ x 5 1/4″″ squares

Here are my patches.

First, take the medium and light 5 1/4″ squares and lay the light ones on top of the medium ones.

Draw the two diagonals on each pair.

Sew one quarter of an inch away from both sides of one diagonal.

Cut along both diagonals.

Press the pieces open.

Arrange them in pairs like this.

Make sure the seams butt up against each other and chain sew together.

Press open. You should have four squares like this.

Arrange these with the rest of your patches. Sew three rows together taking care to alternate the way the seams are pressed on each row. Sew the three rows together and press.

Traditional Patchwork Quilt Pattern and Tutorial (Part 9)

Here is the eighth block from a series of 12. The finished size when the block is sewn into the quilt top is 12 inches square. Enjoy!

You will need:

Five light 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares

One white 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ square

One light 5 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ square

Two medium 4 7/8″ x 4 7/8″ squares

Here are my patches.

First make the small triangle patches. Cut both the 5 1/4″ light and white squares across both diagonals to get four triangles from each square.

Position them like this and sew them together.

Press seams towards the darker fabric.

Next, take the two 4 7/8″ medium squares and cut them across the diagonal. They should be the same size as the ones you just made by sewing together pairs of triangles.

You should be able to make four of these.

Chain sew these together to make four three-triangle-squares.

Here are mine.

Arrange the squares on a table. Take care to place the colours correctly.

Sew together to make three rows. Alternate the direction in which you press the seams so they will butt up against each other when you sew the rows together.

Sew the three rows together.

Traditional Patchwork Quilt Pattern and Tutorial (Part 8)

Here is the seventh block from a series of 12. The finished size when the block is sewn into the quilt top is 12 inches square. Enjoy!

You will need:

One medium 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square

Two white 4 7/8″ x 4 7/8″ squares

Two medium 4 7/8″ x 4 7/8″ squares

Eight white 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares

Eight medium 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares

Here are my patches.

First make the four-patch blocks. Start with a pair of white and medium 2 1/2″ squares.

Sew them together and then chain sew the other seven pairs in the same way.

Press the seams towards the dark fabric. You should have eight pieces like this. Arrange the pieces into the four-patch blocks.

Chain sew all four of the four-patch blocks, taking care to butt the seams against each other to ensure a good match in the centre.

You should now have four four-patch squares.

Next, make the half square triangles. Place the two white 4 7/8″ squares on top of the two medium 4 7/8″ squares.

Draw the diagonal lines.

Sew one quarter of an inch away from both sides of the lines.

Cut along the lines to get four half square triangles.

Open up and press the seams towards the darkest fabric. Bear in mind that you may need to change this direction depending on how bulky the seams will be on the back when the nine patches are sewn to complete the block.

Arrange the squares on a table. Take care to place the colours correctly.

Sew together to make three rows. Alternate the direction in which you press the seams so they will butt up against each other when you sew the rows together.

Sew the three rows together.

Traditional Patchwork Quilt Pattern and Tutorial (Part 7)

Here is the sixth block from a series of 12. The finished size when the block is sewn into the quilt top is 12 inches square. Enjoy!

You will need:

Two white 4 7/8″ x 4 7/8″ squares

Two dark 4 7/8″ x 4 7/8″ squares

Ten white 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares

Ten medium 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares

Here are my patches.

First make the four-patch blocks. Start with a pair of white and medium 2 1/2″ squares.

Sew them together and then chain sew the other nine pairs in the same way.

Press the seams towards the dark fabric. You should have ten pieces like this.

Arrange the pieces into the four-patch blocks.

Chain sew all five of the four-patch blocks, taking care to butt the seams against each other to ensure a good match in the centre.

You should now have five four-patch squares.

Next, make the half square triangles. Place the two white 4 7/8″ squares on top of the two dark 4 7/8″ squares.

Draw the diagonal lines.

Sew one quarter of an inch away from both sides of the lines.

Cut along the lines to get four half square triangles.

Open up and press the seams towards the darkest fabric. Bear in mind that you may need to change this direction depending on how bulky the seams will be on the back when the nine patches are sewn to complete the block.

Arrange the squares on a table. Take care to place the colours correctly.

Sew together to make three rows. Alternate the direction in which you press the seams so they will butt up against each other when you sew the rows together.

Sew the three rows together.

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